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usability

GUIs: Control, Conveyance, Continuity, and Context

Windows 8 Animated EvaluationI'm a sucker for basic principles distilled into pithy prescriptions.

A freelance writer, Brian Boyko, has distilled the basic features of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) into four principles: Control, Conveyance, Continuity, and Context. He uses them to structure a well-reasoned though shrill critique of Windows 8

I've just checked a few of my favorite usability resources (Don Norman, Alan Cooper's About Face, Ben Shneiderman), plus a bit of Googling, and I can't find a "recognized GUI authority" who reduces the problem to these four aspects.

Even so, I think Boyko has hit on something good. When I tried to distill a modern set of security-relevant design principles for my textbook, I had no concise statement about usable security that was backed up by extensive industry practice. In other words, there are accepted design principles for security, but not for usable security. There are a lot of principles that outline what's nice to have, but none that trump security traditions (like impossible-to-memorize passwords).

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Computers and Health Care

David Himmelstein of Cambridge Hospital and Harvard Med School (with co-authors) recently published a paper on the effect of computerization of hospitals.

The results, as Computerworld put it: Computers don't save hospitals money.

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This makes sense, especially when you look at the study. They focused on data collected reported by individual hospitals nationwide between 2003 and 2007. Computerization, especially at the clinical level, is incredibly disruptive. Thus, the efficiencies aren't likely to arise soon.

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