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Secure Computing Corporation

The challenge of employee monitoring

Tam Harbert has posted a fairly even-handed discussion of employee monitoring in Computerworld. This is a difficult topic to address, since it treads on the fine line between employee privacy and a company's obligation to ensure efficient use of their resources. When Secure Computing bought Webster Webtrack, a web filtering product, back in the 1990s, the developers said that they'd see drops of 70% in web traffic when users knew they were being monitored.

It's a well known fact - people are more likely to behave if they think they're being watched. And it's easy to waste time surfing the web.

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A Memoir of Secure Computing Corporation

Now that Secure Computing Corporation is a memory, having been acquired by McAfee, I'm going to write up a few memories of my own experiences. At one point I posted much of this in the appropriate Wikipedia entry, but that's actually not kosher. Since much of it is based on personal recollection, these words fall in line with what they call "original research." So I'm posting it here.

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I joined Secure Computing about a year after it came into existence. It was called "Secure Computing Technology Corporation" at the time. By the time I left, they'd gone through three more company presidents, 4 corporate logos, several mergers, and bounced the corporate headquarters from Minnesota to Silicon Valley.

Senator McCain and "Internet Cryptography"

In honor of the electoral season, I'm sharing an old photograph. The occasion was a visit by Senator John McCain (R-AZ) to Secure Computing in June, 1999. We discussed possible revisions to cryptographic export controls, and he posed for photos, holding a copy of Internet Cryptography, which was 'recently published' back then.

I don't want to turn this into a political blog - this posting simply reports on the visit.

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LOCK - A trusted computing system

The LOCK project (short for LOgical Coprocessing Kernel) developed a "trusted computing system" that implemented multilevel security. LOCK was intended to exceed the requirements for an "A1" system as defined by the old Trusted Computing System Evaluation Criteria (a.k.a. the TCSEC or "Orange Book").

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Multilevel Security and Internet Servers

I wrote the following message as part of a discussion on the old Firewalls mailing list in 1996. The message was part of a discussion on the use of MLS technology to protect Internet servers from attack. The basic concepts still apply in some ways, though the threats have evolved in many other ways.

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